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Although Deadwood’s gaming revenue has largely been down in 2017, a 0.3% increase in spending across table games and slot machines occurred in November 2017 when compared to November 2016. According to the Black Hills Pioneer, table games were up 6.4% when compared to November of last year, while slot machines were down 0.1% when compared across the same timeframe.

Hotel occupancy was also slightly higher in November 2017 than November 2016. Hotels were 30.4% occupied, a 1.4% increase over November 2016. Executive Director of the Deadwood Gaming Association Mike Rodman indicated milder temperatures and events including a craft beer festival may have increased this year’s occupancy rates.

To read more news from Deadwood, visit the Black Hills Knowledge Network’s online news archive.

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Deadwood gaming numbers from October 2017 were down 1% from October 2016, according to the South Dakota Commission on Gaming. As reported by the Black Hills Pioneer, patrons to Deadwood casinos played $91.5 million on both machines and tables last month.

While overall numbers were down, table games increased by 3.5 percent last month when compared to October 2016. Slot machines were down 1.3 percent when compared to the same point in time last year.

To learn more about Deadwood, visit the Black Hills Knowledge Network’s community profile.

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Thursday, 02 November 2017 17:13

IN HISTORY: Deadwood Legalizes Gambling in 1989

On November 1, 1989, gambling was officially legalized in Deadwood, South Dakota. As the casinos reopened, gamblers placed approximately $145 million in bets during the first eight months legalized gambling. Although there was an early snowfall which made driving conditions difficult, Deadwood’s Main Street was filled with tourists looking to win big in the newly-opened saloons.

Gambling was legalized in Deadwood in an effort to diversify the town’s economy. The largest employer was the nearby Homestake Gold Mine, which provided a few hundred jobs to area residents. Tourism was Deadwood’s next largest economic contributor, which ebbed and flowed alongside the seasons.

Canvassers sought enough signatures from registered voters across the state to allow a state constitutional amendment to approve limited gambling in Deadwood on the November 1988 ballot. South Dakota voters approved the amendment by a wide margin. The state legislature drafted and passed the requisite legislation to approve gambling during the following legislative session early in 1989. Finally, the last step required Deadwood residents to approve gambling in a town election

Prior to the legalization in 1989, gambling had been banned in Deadwood since 1905. While many residents of the town were pleased with the ban, miners who lived in town lost gambling houses as places to relax and enjoy a drink after a long day in the mines.

To learn more about Deadwood, visit the Black Hills Knowledge Network’s community profile.

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Following stable growth over the summer months, gaming revenue in Deadwood took a fall in September. According to the Black Hills Pioneer, gaming numbers declined by nearly two percent when compared to September 2016. However, September 2017 revenue was down nearly 12 percent when compared to September 2015.

Nearly $6.2 million in revenue was reported from table games in Deadwood, representing an increase of 8.6 percent from September 2016. However, the total slot machine handle for September 2017 of $95.2 million accounted for a 2.6 percent decline from September 2016.

For more information about Deadwood, visit the Black Hills Knowledge Network’s online news archive or community profile.

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Deadwood’s casinos saw an uptick in revenue last month, reports the Black Hills Pioneer. In July 2017, just over $106 million was played on machines and tables in the city, resulting in a 0.6 percent increase over July 2016.

While gaming numbers increased slightly, stays at the city’s hotels declined by approximately 2.0 percent in July 2017. Celebrity Hotel and Casino General Manager Ken Gienger indicated rental homes marketed online may be contributed to the decline in hotel stays. Travel websites are also used to help gauge the relative cost of prices to keep hotels competitive.

To read more about Deadwood, visit the Black Hills Knowledge Network’s online news archive or community profile.

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In May, slot machines in Deadwood posted increased numbers when compared to May 2016, reports the Black Hills Pioneer. According to data from the South Dakota Gaming Commission, machine and table gambling increased by 7.6 percent, marking the only increase for the industry so far this year.

Gamblers placed over $99 million in Deadwood’s slot machines and tables in May, resulting in a total of $432 million bets for all over 2017. Nine percent of the $99 million was collected for state sales tax.

Slot machines were the primary contributors to revenue gains in May at $93.7 million, a 8.4 percent increase when compared to May 2016. However, table games were slightly down when compared to May of last year at approximately $5 million in wagers, or 5.3 percent less than May 2016.

Visit the Black Hills Knowledge Network’s community profile to learn more about Deadwood. Read more recent news from Deadwood at the Black Hills Knowledge Network’s online news archive.

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In June 1905, the mayor of Deadwood and Lawrence County officials announced a gambling in Deadwood that would take effect in July, as reported by the New York Times. As noted by the Times, Deadwood without gambling was like “a river without water.”

Prior to the ban, approximately 70 gambling attendants throughout Deadwood earned a daily wage of $6. The City of Deadwood also lost out on a bit of revenue as a result of the ban, as it had assessed a $25 fine to each of about two dozen gambling houses.

The Pierre Capital Journal reported that many residents of the area were pleased with the gambling ban, but the Deadwood PIoneer-Times offered a conflicting viewpoint. The Pioneer-Times insisted that the gambling houses served as a means of entertainment for miners who had less than stellar lodging accommodations. The gambling houses offered the men a comfortable place to relax and have a drink after a long day.

Accounts of gambling arrests following the ban may indicate that the Pioneer-Times had it right. In October 1905, four men were arrested and charged with possession of gambling paraphernalia, including poker chips and roulette wheel.

Over 80 years later, voters in South Dakota approved gambling on a limited-stake basis in Deadwood. In 1989, casinos reopened in the town and $145 million in bets were made in the first eight months of operation. In 2000, South Dakota voters again approved of gambling in the city by increasing bet limits from $5 to $100. Roulette, keno and craps were approved for operation just four years later.

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Friday, 28 April 2017 21:53

Decline in Deadwood Gaming Revenue Slows

Although revenue from gaming in Deadwood was still down 1.2 percent from March 2016, the decline is slower than in previous months of 2017, reports the Black Hills Pioneer. Gamers in Deadwood played a total of $93.6 million across both machines and tables. The slight decline in March 2017 contributed to the overall year-to-date decline of 7.2 percent.

While gaming revenue declined, there was a slight increase in hotel occupancy when compared to March 2016. Last month, 38.6 percent of hotels in Deadwood were occupied, reflecting a 3.4 percent increase over March 2016. Mike Rodman, executive director of the Deadwood Gaming Association, attributed the increase in hotel occupancy to the city’s St. Patrick’s Day activities as well as the concert line-up at the Deadwood Mountain Grand.

To read more news about Deadwood, visit the Black Hills Knowledge Network’s online news archive. Learn more about Deadwood at the Black Hills Knowledge Network’s community profile

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Gaming revenues dropped by 11 percent in February 2017 when compared to February 2016, reports the Black Hills Pioneer. The decline in revenue may be attributed to fewer visitors in Deadwood in recent months. Visitors to Deadwood dropped $79.2 million in the city’s slot machines and tables in February 2017. To date, annual gaming revenue has been down 10.5 percent when compared to the same time in 2016.

Hotel stays in Deadwood also edged down in February 2017. The city’s hotels had a 36.5 percent occupancy rate, 0.2 percent lower than in February 2016. This placed Deadwood below the average national hotel occupancy rate in February which was 61.2 percent in February 2017.

To read more news from Deadwood, visit the Black Hills Knowledge Network’s online news archive or Deadwood community profile

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Gaming revenue in Deadwood was down nearly 10 percent from January 2016, reports the Black Hills Pioneer. A total of $76.7 million was spent across tables and slot machines last month, accounting for a $6.7 million in taxable adjusted gross revenues. $605,190 was collected in state tax.

Occupancy at hotels in Deadwood was also down year-over-year. Last month, there was a 30.7 percent occupancy rate at Deadwood’s hotels, down 4.2 percent from January 2016. The city also fell behind the national hotel occupancy rate of 54.1 percent—a 0.5 percent increase over January 2016.

For more news from Deadwood, visit the Black Hills Knowledge Network’s online news archive or community page.

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A sharp decline in Deadwood’s gaming revenue closed out 2016, reports the Black Hills Pioneer. Revenue from December 2016 was down 25 percent when compared to December 2015.

The total 2016 Deadwood gaming revenue of $1.1 billion was down five percent from 2015. Adjusted gross gaming revenue was $99,110,350 in 2016—the lowest reported since 2007.  Nine percent, or $478,007, of taxable adjusted gross revenues was collected as state tax in December.

The general manager of the Celebrity Hotel and Casino, Ken Gienger noted that warmer than expected temperatures may have contributed to the drop in gaming revenue in in December. He noted that December 2016 occupancy rates were higher than December 2015 at his hotel, but guests were not gambling as much as they had in previous years.

To read more news from Deadwood, visit the Black Hills Knowledge Network’s online news archive

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Deadwood's gaming revenue in November edged up 1.25 percent when compared to November of last year, reports the Black Hills Pioneer. This month’s slight increase marks a break from previous months in which gaming revenue was down from 2015 numbers.

In November, gamblers in Deadwood spent a total of $79.9 million at slot machines and tables, resulting in $626,703 in state sales tax. Table games were up 2.9 percent from November of last year, while slot machines were down 4.0 percent over the same time period. To date, gaming revenues from both slot machines and tables are down 3.3 percent from the same time last year.

To read more about Deadwood, visit the Black Hills Knowledge Network’s online news archive

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Gaming revenue in Deadwood was down 6.6 percent in October, reports the Black Hills Pioneer. Gamblers spent s $92.4 million at casinos in Deadwood last month, reflecting the 6.6 percent decrease when compared to October 2015. The adjusted gross revenue was $8.4 million.

While gaming revenues in Deadwood have been down throughout 2016, hotel rooms were up slightly at 1.2 percent when compared to the same time last year. Celebrity Hotel Manager Ken Gienger sees Deadwood as a hub for visitors who utilize the city for its lodging and dining, but explore the Black Hills as entertainment rather than gaming.

To read more news from Deadwood, visit the Black Hills Knowledge Network’s online news archive

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September’s gaming revenue in Deadwood decreased by 10.23 percent when compared to revenue at the same time last year, as reported by South Dakota Department of Revenue September Industry Statistics Report and the Rapid City Journal.  Slot machines in the city were hit hardest, falling 10.81 percent to $97.7 million in September. Conversely, revenue from table games increased by 1.04 percent to $5.7 million. Overall gaming revenue in Deadwood is down 3.35 percent for 2016.

The average payouts were highest for Black Jack tables at 88.41 percent while the lowest payouts were seen at Keno tables at just 52.25 percent.  Dime slot machines had the highest payouts in their category at 96.70 percent. Twenty-five dollar slot machines had the lowest average payouts at 89.24 percent.

To read more about gambling in the Black Hills region, visit the Black Hills Knowledge Network’s online news archive

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Cadillac Jack’s Gaming Resort is moving forward with its second major renovation effort following the approval of a Tax Increment District located southwest of the hotel and casino, according to the Black Hills Pioneer. Tax Increment District #10 utilizes Tax Increment Financing (TIF) which helps blighted areas that, when developed, would contribute to the economic well-being of the state. Municipalities may use this type of financing as established through South Dakota Law Chapter 11-9.

Many improvements in the project will not only benefit the gaming facility, but the city as well. Repairs including burying powerlines, replacing portions of water mains, and relocating part of Williams Street will be completed during the renovation process. The $2 million TIF approved by the City of Deadwood will help finance part of the reconstruction efforts. Cadillac Jack’s officials project the repayment to be complete by 2029.

To read more recent news about Deadwood, visit the Black Hills Knowledge Network’s online news archive

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Wednesday, 28 September 2016 22:47

Deadwood Gaming Revenue Down from 2015

Revenue from gambling in Deadwood this August was down 4.7 percent from August 2015, as reported by the Black Hills Pioneer.  Deadwood Gaming Association Executive Director Mike Rodman attributed the decline to fewer tourists as well as fewer attendees at the Sturgis Motorcycle Rally this summer.

Comparatively, gaming revenue for 2016 has increase by 5.3 percent from last year. Slot machines have experienced a slight decline at 3 percent when compared to 2015. Occupancy rates at Deadwood hotels were also down at 66.7 percent, or nearly 4.1 percent from 2015.

To read more about the City of Deadwood, visit the Black Hills Knowledge Network online news archive. For facts about households, workforce and demographics in Deadwood, visit the South Dakota Dashboard

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The slowdown in production in both the North Dakota oil fields and the Wyoming coal industry has rippled through Deadwood casinos, reports the Black Hills Pioneer.

For at least two consecutive months, betting and revenue were down compared to those same months in 2015. Deadwood gaming leaders said the situation is the result of "regional economic impacts," specifically fewer people working in the energy industry in neighboring states. 

In April 2016, gamblers bet a total of $86.3 million in Deadwood casinos, 9.2 percent less than the $95 they bet in April 2015. The picture is different when looking at slot machines, down 10.9 percent for April, or table games, up almost 25 percent. In March 2016, total bets were down 1.7 percent from March 2015.

Slots continue to make up the lion's share of gambling activity, accounting for $80.5 million of wagers in April compared to $5.8 million for table games. Blackjack leads table games with $2.4 million in wagers in April. The gambling industry credits interest in the relatively new games of craps, roulette and keno for growth in table games. 

For the year so far, slot machine wagers are down 1.7 percent while table game wagers are up more than 10 percent. 

Read more about gambling on the Black Hills Knowledge Network

 

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Tuesday, 01 March 2016 00:00

Deadwood Casinos Post January Gains

Gamblers wagered $85.2 million at Deadwood slot machines and table games in January 2016, a 1.71 bump up from January 2015, reports the Black Hills Pioneer

Gaming officials credited the newly legal table games of keno, craps, and roulette for the increased betting, but slot machines continue to draw the lion's share of gamblers. In January 2016, $79.2 million was bet in slot machines, with more than $57.1 million coming from penny slots. At table games, $5.1 million was bet. Of that, $2.4 million came at blackjack tables and $1.9 million at poker tables. The three new games accounted for less than $682,000. 

Casinos took in $7.5 million and paid 9 percent in tax, or $678,918, that was distributed to the state general fund budget, Lawrence County, the South Dakota Gaming Commission and the South Dakota Tourism Department.

Read more about gambling on the Black Hills Knowledge Network

 

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Wednesday, 09 December 2015 00:00

Deadwood Gaming Down in October

Slot machine wagers in Deadwood dropped 4.78 percent in October 2015 as compared to October 2014, reports the Rapid City Journal. That drop drug overall Deadwood gambling down 3.42 percent October-over-October, as slot machines account for 90 percent of the Wild West town's betting. 

The table games of poker, black jack, craps, roulette and keno jumped almost 23 percent, but bets at the table games totaled $6.2 million compared to $92.8 million for slots. 

As of the end of October, gamblers wagered more than $1 billion in Deadwood casinos, putting the gambling action up 3.19 percent year-to-date. For the month, casinos paid more than $790,000 in taxes, which is 9 percent of casinos' gross revenue. 

Read more about Deadwood on the Black Hills Knowledge Network

 

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Monday, 28 September 2015 00:00

Deadwood Casinos Continue Climb

Gamblers have wagered 3.46 percent more in Deadwood casinos in 2015 than in 2014, continuing a months-long trend of more gaming activity in the Wild West town, reports the Black Hills Pioneer.

The information from the South Dakota Gaming Commission's monthly reports covers activity through August, with table games increasing by 6.67 percent compared to 3.23 percent for slot machines. However, slot machines account for 16 times more gambling than do table games, with $740.6 million being wagered on slots January through August compared to $46.2 million for table games. Overall, wagers increased 3.42 percent for that timeframe. 

Industry leaders credited the increase on a larger than usual Sturgis motorcycle rally -- the 75th anniversary -- and on the games of craps, roulette and keno newly approved by voters. 

Read more about Deadwood gambling on the Black Hills Knowledge Network.

 

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